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Toro

Welcome to Toro

All red, no bull’ should be the tagline for this region specializing in big, serious red wines. Toro, Spanish for bull, is situated on a stark, desolate stretch of the N-122 highway between Zamora and Tordesillas near to the border with Portugal. The desert is high, the rain infrequent. The soil is sandy and the en vaso bush vines with their thick trunks and craggily limbs stick out of the earth half-petrified by the pounding Spanish sun. Read on…

The old vines and deep root systems give superior, concentrated, and full-bodied fruit of the tinta de toro varietal. This local iteration of tempranillo is far enough removed from its neighbors that it gets it own name. Studies have confirmed that it does descend from tempranillo, but that it had morphed just enough to cope with the extreme fluctuations in temperature and harsh weather to be called a clone, and to take a name reflective of the area; literally: red from toro.

The ancient town predates Roman conquerors that planted vines and celebrated the high quality wine that the vines produced. Columbus carried barrels of Toro wine to the new world because of the high alcohol and structure that contributed to its longevity. In modern times, the wine struggled to be sold outside the local market. Then the wine from Toro became an eponymous official appellation, government subsidies flowed in and stainless steel was installed everywhere. The now clean and filtered wines eliminated inconsistencies and only very recently have winemakers begun to tackle the high alcohol of their wines (often fibbed on labels even to this day), conceding that the world market is trending toward more quaffable, low alcohol wines with less complexity. There is a big future for Toro, especially for those going against the grain and continuing to produce terroir-driven wines.

Wines

Winemakers

  

Map

Facts